Hõ trợ trực tuyến
Nhất Đại Thánh Sư -Tư Vấn Luận Án TS Nhất Đại Thánh Sư -Tư Vấn Luận Án TS
09.63.68.69.68
My status
Nhận hồ sơ Tuyển sinh CĐ-ĐH Y Dược-Sư Phạm Nhận hồ sơ Tuyển sinh CĐ-ĐH Y Dược-Sư Phạm
09.63.63.63.15

Tất cả PDF Doc/Xml/Ppt/Text Prc Chm Lit Âm thanh Video
share developing your teaching lên facebook cho bạn bè cùng đọc!
developing your teaching

Ngày đăng: 15/09/2015 Lượt xem: 753 Người Upload: AMBN
Yêu thích: 0 Báo xấu: 0 Loại file: pdf

Developing Your Teaching beyond our ideas, to insight and action. The result is a text that avoids the style and tone of so many, no doubt worthy, books in this market that are aimed nowadays at new recruits to the teaching profession in higher education. Here you will find no watered-down coverage of theories and research, which might leave you feeling somewhat patronised as well as slightly overwhelmed and inadequate...The writers also work unobtrusively, but effectively, at encouraging active learning on the part of the reader. I have never been a great enthusiast for in-text questions in textbooks – apparently patronising questions that seem to expect me to find a piece of paper and write down my responses.

Peter Kahn  and Lorraine Walsh

 

Developing Your Teaching

 

IDEAS, INSIGHT AND ACTION

 

 

Developing Your Teaching engages you in a dialogue that both supports and challenges you in developing your teaching. Focusing on the processes involved in this, and the practical actions that you can take, it encourages a continuous approach to development, seeking insight and inspiration to underpin the process. Through a blend of ideas, interactive review points and case study examples from university teachers, the book unfolds as an accessible handbook for professional practice and provides ideas on a range of topics including:

 

■ choosing effective teaching practices

■ learning from student feedback and peer review

■ working with others

■ mentoring

■ carrying out development projects

■ undertaking specific roles that involve the development of teaching.

 

Developing Your Teaching will be particularly helpful for new lecturers, tutors and graduate teaching assistants. Experienced staff involved in ongoing professional development for their teaching will also benefit, as this book is for everyone who would like to think more deeply about their teaching.

 

Peter Kahn is Senior Professional Development Adviser at the University of Manchester, where he works with a range of staff whose interests are in the development of education. His earlier books include the co-edited A Guide to Staff and Educational Development and Effective Learning and Teaching in Mathematics and its Applications, both now from Routledge.

 

Lorraine Walsh is the Director of Academic Professional Development at the University of Dundee, and her main interests are in continuing professional development and the professional identity of university teachers.

 

 

Kate Exley

 

This indispensable series is aimed at new lecturers, postgraduate students who have teaching time, graduate teaching assistants, part-time tutors and demonstrators, as well as experienced teaching staff who may feel it is time to review their skills in teaching and learning.

 

Titles in this series will provide the teacher in higher education with practical, realistic guidance on the various different aspects of their teaching role, which is underpinned not only by current research in the field, but also by the extensive experience of individual authors, with a keen eye kept on the limitations and opportunities therein. By bridging a gap between academic theory and practice, all titles will provide generic guidance on teaching, learning and assessment issues which is then brought to life through the use of short illustrative examples drawn from a range of disciplines. All titles in this series will:

 

■ represent up-to-date thinking and incorporate the use of communication and information technologies (C&IT) Where appropriate;

■ consider methods and approaches for teaching and learning when there is an increasing diversity in learning and a growth in student numbers;

■ encourage reflective practice and self-evaluation, and a means of developing the skills of teaching, learning and assessment;

■ provide links and references to further work on the topic and research evidence where appropriate.

 

Titles in the series will prove invaluable whether they are used for self-study or as part of a formal induction programme on teaching in higher education, and will also be of relevance to teaching staff working in further education settings.

 

Other titles in this series:

 

Assessing Skills and Practice – Sally Brown and Ruth Pickford

Assessing Students’ Written Work: Marking Essays and Reports– Catherine Haines

Designing Learning: From Module Outline to Effective Teaching– Chris Butcher, Clara Davies and Melissa Highton

Developing Your Teaching: Ideas, Insight and Action– Peter Kahn and Lorraine Walsh

Giving a Lecture: From Presenting to Teaching– Kate Exley and Reg Dennick

Small Group Teaching– Kate Exley and Reg Dennick

Using C&IT to Support Teaching– Paul Chin

 

 

 

Foreword

 

As soon as I began to read this book, I felt as if a close friend was taking me through one important educational topic after another – and it seemed as if one writer, and not two, was doing that. This almost avuncular friend offered me advice and suggestions in a thoughtful and thought-provoking way that left me feeling that I had profited from each chapter, from each exchange between us. It was only when I finished reading that it dawned on me that this was supposed to be a book directed first of all towards readers who are relatively new to university teaching. What a wonderful ability the writers have displayed, then, in managing without apparent effort to be as useful and interesting to an old greybeard such as me as they will undoubtedly prove to the next generation of university teachers!

 

How have they managed to cater effectively for such a wide readership? I am sure part of their secret lies in the way they have commissioned, edited and used to pertinent effect what they call case studies, but which to me are succinct and telling cameos. The brevity of these short accounts focuses the reader on the message that may matter to them in the encapsulated piece of experience, and that can be drawn upon, or even pillaged. It also helps avoid the danger that a reader may shrug off a longer account with the disparaging ‘This is fine, but it’s not in my discipline! ’ These cameos effectively introduce and then reinforce and explain important and generalisable points in the main text; They also provide many useful and practical suggestions in so doing.

 

The result is a text that avoids the style and tone of so many, no doubt worthy, books in this market that are aimed nowadays at new recruits to the teaching profession in higher education. Here you will find no watered-down coverage of theories and research, which might leave you feeling somewhat patronised as well as slightly overwhelmed and inadequate. Instead the writers present their rationale for each topic in their coverage with what I tended to assimilate as reasoned arguments – exemplified and substantiated by these short cameos or case studies, and with due reference to the experts throughout. Their wise choice of references is provided for the benefit of those who wish to delve deeper, although the text on its own will be self-sufficient for many first-time teachers making a start in this demanding profession.

 

The writers also work unobtrusively, but effectively, at encouraging active learning on the part of the reader. I have never been a great enthusiast for in-text questions in textbooks – apparently patronising questions that seem to expect me to find a piece of paper and write down my responses. I did not ever feel that these writers were going to be disappointed if I failed to respond in that way; Yet I knew, somehow, that they expected me to think about their questions – and

 

I certainly did so, and did so profitably, as far as I was concerned. Even the grouping of topics in the various chapters conveys a message to the reader, as well as saying something important about the writers and their values. In the early chapters we are taken straightaway into issues of motivation for teaching, the value of adopting an objective and systematic approach to the way we plan our teaching, and to a sharing with and by the writers of their own enthusiasm for a task, which has sometimes been downplayed in these research-conscious years, yet can be so rewarding in its turn. Tellingly, then, they next take us on to how we can review whatever teaching we are already planning and presenting and to how we can learn and develop and profit from that review. ‘Bravo’, I found myself exclaiming when I reached that point, for formative evaluation still tends to be a somewhat neglected topic in higher educational circles, yet it can so often be the cost-effective springboard from which developments – and fulfilment – originate.

 

The next switch of emphasis is welcome, appropriate – but again perhaps slightly unusual in this type of text. We are encouraged to think, and to think constructively, about working with others, about using mentors, about harnessing the potential of critical friends, and above all about creating effective support networks, which we will undoubtedly need and from which we can profit greatly. The days of individual teaching are well behind us; We do well to think (as we are encouraged to do here) In terms of communities of learning and collaborative approaches to our teaching.

 

It is clear, by this point in their text, that these writers are encouraging us – effectively – to think in terms of advancing the quality of our teaching and of our students’ learning experiences, in the present climate where so much development has taken place in recent years, and where the pace of development and enhancement continues to accelerate. They follow up that encouragement with thorough, and again practical, advice and suggestions about our engagement in pedagogical and action research, leading into a general discussion of the scholarship of learning and teaching and how we can and should relate to it.

 

If I had a friend or relative who was entering higher education as a teacher, I could think of no more suitable mentor to inspire, advise, encourage and sustain them than the duo who have written this rather exceptional book. I do hope that you, who have borrowed or purchased it, will find as much inspiration, sound common sense, reasoned rationale and exemplars of sound practice as I have already done – and will undoubtedly continue to do when I re-read it, as I shall certainly do.

 

John Cowan

 

developing your teaching idea to insight to action

 

 

................................ (190 Trang/Pgaes)

 

List of illustrations

 

Foreword

Series preface

Acknowledgements

1 The beginning of development

2 Choosing effective teaching practices

3 Inspiration for teaching

4 Self-evaluation of your practice

5 Learning from others

6 Working with others

7 Mentoring

8 Development projects and research into learning

9 Teaching development roles

10 A sense of direction

Index

 

 

 

Keywords:peter kahn  and lorraine walsh,developing your teaching from ideas,to beyond insight and action,phát triển khả năng dạy học,sư phạm từ chính ý tưởng nghề nghiệp, sự sáng suốt trong quyết định và hành động

 

TT Tên file Ấn hành Tác giả Thông số Tải về Xem-Nghe Giá Down
1 developing your teaching AMBN(St) PeterKahn 180Tr Download file developing your teaching 231
Khu vực quy định Bản quyền tài liệu và chất lượng tài liệu Khu vực quy định Hướng dẫn download tài liệu trên trang AMBN

Tìm bài thi Hỏi đáp Liên Hệ Tài liệu trên internet Tin giáo dục Quy định sử dụng

developing your teaching

developing your teaching

Hướng dẫn download tài liệu trên trang AMBN

Đăng nhập tài khoản
Các mục quảng cáo
Thống kê truy cập
Đang Online: 336
Hôm nay:46760
Hôm qua: 61187
Trong tháng 696165
Tháng trước1750591
Số lượt truy cập: 115087006